Today 18 July 2019, Thursday - Last updated at ora 15:38
Abonamente

News 24 March 2019, at 20:48

TIME What to Know About the Origins of Fascism’s Brutal Ideology

Marime Font

 When Benito Mussolini debuted the Fasci Italiani di Combattimento, the precursor to his fascist party, on Mar. 23, 1919, in Milan, he wasn’t inventing the idea of violent authoritarianism. But he put a name on a new and terrible breed of it. Under his leadership, squads of militants attacked, beat and killed fellow Italians; later, once he had become the authoritarian ruler of Italy, he oversaw brutality in Ethiopia, an alliance with Hitler and the persecution of Italy’s Jewish population and others, among other crimes.

 


Yet even a century later, during a new era of strongmen, his idea remains sadly powerful. “Fascism is a disease,” former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright told TIME last year, “and there are symptoms. So I think it’s important to warn about that.”

cTo better understand the rise and fall — and rise again — of fascism, TIME spoke to Ruth Ben-Ghiat, an expert on first fascist dictator Benito Mussolini and a professor of History and Italian Studies at New York University.


What is fascism?

Fascism is a movement that promotes the idea of a forcibly monolithic, regimented nation under the control of an autocratic ruler. The word fascism comes from fascio, the Italian word for bundle, which in this case represents bundles of people. Its origins go back to Ancient Rome, when the fasces was a bundle of wood with an ax head, carried by leaders.

On March 23, 1919, the Fasci Italiani di Combattimento — a group that grew out of a number of earlier movements that had also used the image of the fascio in their names — met for the first time in Piazza San Sepolcro in Milan. At this rally, Mussolini said that membership in the new group “commits all fascists to sabotaging the candidacies of the neutralists of all parties by any means necessary.”

“Mussolini thought that democracy was a failed system. He thought that liberty of expression and liberty of parties was a sham, and that fascism would organize people under state power,” Ben-Ghiat says. “Their idea was you would be freer because you wouldn’t have any class consciousness. You’re just supposed to worship the nation. It’s nation over class.”

The corollary of that belief was the idea that anything that might impede national unity had to be gotten rid of, and violently. In fact, violence was seen as beneficial to society.

And “society” was not a loosely defined idea. Rather, Mussolini and those who came after him had very specific ideas about who got to be part of the nation. It followed that those who did not fit the mold were seen as disruptive to that unity, and thus subject to violence.


“You can look up definitions of fascism and often, if they’re not about Hitler, race won’t be in there,” Ben-Ghiat says. “That’s something that often gets left out, especially [when talking about] fascist Italy. There was this idea that Hitler was anti-Semitic and Mussolini wasn’t, but it’s about a larger concept of race. Mussolini was an imperialist, so he used colonialism to [abuse] people of color. The fear of white decline was a huge part of it. Women were supposed to go have a lot of babies to increase the white race. A lot of old-fashioned explanations of fascism don’t talk about that.”

Who created fascism?

Mussolini was a journalist who founded the Milan-based newspaper Il Popolo d’Italia. Originally a socialist party member, he left the group when he fought in World War I. After the war, fascists declared the socialists public enemy number one over their anti-war positions. He became Italy’s prime minister in 1922 and over the next few years turned that position into one of dictatorial power.

“Benito Mussolini came up with the term fascism, he created the first one-party fascist state and he set the playbook and template for everything that came after,” Ben-Ghiat says.

An important part of that was the cult of personality that emerged around the Italian leader. “[Mussolini] was in newsreels, and he would strip his shirt off,” she says. Though others, like Lenin and Stalin, may be more associated with the idea of such a cult of personality, “of these cheering fans idolizing a leader,” she gives Mussolini credit for creating the mold.

“In the past, there was this idea that Mussolini copied Hitler, but it was actually the other way around for a very long time,” she adds. “Mussolini was in power 11 years before Hitler. He had things all worked out by the time Hitler came to power. Hitler was [initially seen as] a total loser. No one wanted to buy Mein Kampf. No one was interested in him. Then the Great Depression came, and he boomed. [Fascism] is a very important part of Nazism. It began with Hitler wanting to adapt what Mussolini had created. Hitler was such a fan of Mussolini; he was writing him, trying to get an autographed picture, trying to meet him.”

What contributed to the rise of fascism?

Mussolini’s establishment of the proto-Fascist Party took place not too long after the Russian Revolution, and the fear of communism’s spread played a key role.

“The main way the fascists got to power was by killing off and intimidating what was the largest and most popular party, the Socialist Party,” Ben-Ghiat explains. “Squadrists — terrorists who would descend upon towns in trucks, uniformed in black shirts — had knives and they killed thousands of people in the years 1919 to 1922. The killing went on after Mussolini became prime minister.”

Landowners and businessmen in particular supported the suppression of socialism, and their support allowed Mussolini to come to power. Afraid of the might of labor, they “cast their lot with Mussolini” instead. And that group included none other than King Victor Emmanuel III, whose authority would be considerably diminished under Mussolini’s dictatorship.

“Without that early support,” Ben-Ghiat says, “Mussolini wouldn’t have gone anywhere and wouldn’t have had the first fascist dictatorship.”

When did fascism end?

The defeat of the Axis powers in World War II meant the end of one phase of fascism — with some exceptions, like Franco’s Spain, the original fascist regimes had been defeated. But while Mussolini died in 1945, the ideas he put a name on did not.

“It’s really not understood how influential Italian fascism was, because you had Nazism early on, but there were fascist movements in America, in Switzerland, in France, in Spain, and then fascism spread in Argentina,” Ben-Ghiat says. “It’s a transnational movement. That’s how it stayed alive after 1945.”

And that “after” extends all the way to today. Though there was a taboo against the idea, at least in theory, after World War II, she has seen its return since the 1990s as a new wave of strongmen have come to power. With the help of coded language, the old ideas are returning. “We’re living in a time when fascism is getting rehabilitated, in Italy and in other places,” she says. “The fact that this is coming back now is disturbing. Fascism is becoming rehabbed for a new generation. Mussolini and Hitler are being idealized again.”

And some of the language isn’t even coded. “Berlusconi in Italy, when he was in power briefly in the 1990s, he brought the neo-fascists back into the government,” Ben-Ghiat points out. There have been spikes in hate crimes in many places; the President of the E.U. Parliament was forced this month to explain why he had hailed Mussolini; and the man charged with the massacre at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, appears to have declared himself a fascist, according to a manifesto attributed to him.

So, Ben-Ghiat says, asking how fascism has changed during its century of existence is perhaps the wrong question.

“It’s more striking what hasn’t changed —the hyper-nationalism, the leader cult, the idea that this is a leader who is going to save us, the fear of white population decline, anti-feminism, anti-left, things like that,” she says. “None of those things have changed.”

Write to Olivia B. Waxman at olivia.waxman@time.com.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Din aceeaşi secţiune

Cele mai noi ştiri de azi

News 17 July 2019, at: 18:10

Moldova’s foreign minister Nicu Popescu has said that his country “would love to join” the European Union and that the wish is supported by a broad social consensus. He added, however, that Moldova wants to preserve good relations with Russia.

( ) Read all

News 17 July 2019, ora: 18:07

Bloomberg.com - New Cabinet Pledges ‘Quiet Revolution’ Against Graft in Moldova

Bloomberg.com - New Cabinet Pledges ‘Quiet Revolution’ Against Graft in Moldova

Natalia Gavrilita used to run a charity. Now she’s finance minister of a country that has become a byword for corruption and says her modest goal is just to make it normal. That will be a lot harder than it sounds.

( ) Read all

News 16 July 2019, ora: 18:06

Merkel Urges Moldova To Speed Up Reform Pace

Merkel Urges Moldova To Speed Up Reform Pace

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has urged Moldova's new pro-European government to continue on the path of reforms and step up the fight against widespread corruption, saying Berlin would offer Chisinau its support.

( ) Read all

News 14 July 2019, at: 08:46

Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs David Hale congratulated Moldova's new prime minister, Maia Sandu, and expressed U.S. support for her government during a July 13 meeting in the Moldovan capital.

( ) Read all

News 11 July 2019, at: 18:24

 Transnistria cannot remain a kind of a “sovereign entity” over which the great powers politely agree to disagree.

( ) Read all

News 11 July 2019, at: 13:07

ITALY's Matteo Salvini was hit by protests in the Italian Parliament as officials savaged the deputy Prime Minister following allegations of a secret oil deal with Russia.

( ) Read all

News 8 July 2019, at: 18:39

The first batch of oil from the USA arrived at the port of the Ukrainian city of Odesa. According to the press service of the port, 75 thousand tons of Bakken grade oil was purchased by PJSC Ukrtatnafta and will be processed at the Kremenchuk oil refinery.

( ) Read all

News 8 July 2019, at: 18:06

Moldovan Prime Minister Maia Sandu will make an official visit to Ukraine on July 11.

( ) Read all

News 8 July 2019, at: 07:51

 BRUSSELS — The European Union launched an ambitious effort earlier this year to combat election interference: an early-warning system that would sound alarms about Russian propaganda. Despite high expectations, however, records show that the system has become a repository for a...

( ) Read all

News 5 July 2019, at: 10:54

 Lithuania did not breach EU law when it introduced restrictions on a Russian TV channel for incitement to hatred, the European Union Court of Justice ruled on Thursday.

( ) Read all

News 4 July 2019, at: 09:10

Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg welcomed Prime Minister Maia Sandu of the Republic of Moldova to NATO Headquarters in Brussels on Wednesday (3 July 2019).

( ) Read all

News 1 July 2019, at: 12:57

Two days ago, the Council of Europe voted to ignore its own warnings about Russian aggression and human rights violations. Putin invaded Georgia and Ukraine, illegally annexed Crimea, and has spent 20 years destroying democracy in Russia. The CoE, including French and German support, has rewarded...

( ) Read all

News 1 July 2019, at: 11:17

Maia Sandu, the new prime minister of Moldova, vowed that stronger ties with the European Union and cracking down on the abuse of power by the country’s oligarchs are the top priorities of her new government.

( ) Read all

News 30 June 2019, ora: 12:01

New York Times: As Putin pushes a merger, Belarus resists with language, culture and history

New York Times: As Putin pushes a merger, Belarus resists with language, culture and history

 With his vulnerable country under mounting pressure to integrate with Russia, its much bigger and stronger neighbor, a Belarusian poet and television presenter has identified what he thinks is potent weapon of defense: an inch-tall piece of carved deer antler.

( ) Read all

News 29 June 2019, ora: 09:01

The Washington Post: Wait — why are the U.S., Russia and the E.U. suddenly cooperating in Moldova?

The Washington Post: Wait — why are the U.S., Russia and the E.U. suddenly cooperating in Moldova?

And can the government they installed survive?

( ) Read all

News 29 June 2019, ora: 08:55

The Wall Street Journal: Tiny Moldova Fears Russia is Playing a Long Game

The Wall Street Journal: Tiny Moldova Fears Russia is Playing a Long Game

For years, Europe’s poorest country has been torn between Russia and the West—and Moscow still has the upper hand

( ) Read all

News 27 June 2019, at: 08:23

Moldova’s new PM sets pro-Western course

Moldova’s new PM sets pro-Western course

 Maia Sandu also warns of Moscow’s attempts to maintain influence in the small nation.

( ) Read all

News 26 June 2019, ora: 11:33

The Guardian Ukraine walks out of Europe human rights body as Russia returns

Ukraine walks out of Europe human rights body as Russia returns

 The Ukrainian delegation at the parliamentary assembly of the Council of Europe has walked out in protest after Russian MPs were allowed to return to the human rights body five years after the annexation of Crimea.

( ) Read all

News 26 June 2019, ora: 10:33

Transnistria’s leader calls for Russian peacekeepers’ continued presence in the region

Transnistria’s leader calls for Russian peacekeepers’ continued presence in the region

Russian peacekeepers were deployed to the conflict zone on July 29, 1992

( ) Read all

News 25 June 2019, ora: 16:04

Georgia, Ukraine and the Baltic States opposes decision in Council of Europe as Russia may regain voting right

Georgia, Ukraine and the Baltic States opposes decision in Council of Europe as Russia may regain voting right

 Georgia, Ukraine and the Baltic States opposed the decision of the Committee of Ministers at Deputy Level in the Council of Europe (CoE) held during the CoE Helsinki ministerial this week, which spoke in favor [1,2 points] of Russia regaining its voting right in the council of which it was...

( ) Read all

News 24 June 2019, at: 10:04

Moldova's European course established by the Constitution has to be maintained!

Moldova's European course established by the Constitution has to be maintained!

On 21 of June, the Venice Commission adopted the Opinion regarding the constitutional crisis in Moldova, i.e. on the dissolution of the Parliament (see the referrence below). More precisely, it was one of the rare cases when the Commission directly and critically assessed the acts (decisions,...

( ) Read all

News 23 June 2019, ora: 10:27

Platon's offer behind the bars - $ 5 million for anyone in PAS, PPDA, or PSRM who gets him out of jail

Platon's offer behind the bars - $ 5 million for anyone in PAS, PPDA, or PSRM who gets him out of jail

The No.1 raider in CSI has had a very suspicious behavior in the last days. It was expected that Platon, as his prison friend, the former Prime Minister Vlad Filat, would take advantage of the change of the Governance in order to come back to the fore, by placing himself in a "innocent...

( ) Read all

News 21 June 2019, ora: 14:26

Venice Commission: the dissolution of parliament in the Republic of Moldova did not meet the required conditions

Venice Commission: the dissolution of parliament in the Republic of Moldova did not meet the required conditions

 In an opinion adopted today, the Council of Europe’s constitutional law experts, the Venice Commission, found that the conditions for the dissolution of parliament clearly did not exist in the Republic of Moldova on 7 or 8 June 2019.

( ) Read all

News 21 June 2019, ora: 12:26

Financial Times Europe must find its will to power

Europe must find its will to power

“How many divisions does the Pope have?” was supposedly how Joseph Stalin dismissed the notion that the Vatican’s wishes should be taken into account.

( ) Read all

News 21 June 2019, ora: 11:13

Protests erupt in Georgia over Russian MP’s visit

Protests erupt in Georgia over Russian MP’s visit

 A Russian lawmaker taking the podium in Georgia’s parliament on June 20 caused thousands of angry Georgians to take the streets, accusing the ruling party of collaborating with archenemy Russia.

( ) Read all
Current tier / breakpoint: xs sm md lg xl (= visible only on this breakpoint)

.hidden-xs-down .hidden-sm-down .hidden-md-down .hidden-lg-down

.hidden-xs-up .hidden-sm-up .hidden-md-up .hidden-lg-up .hidden-xl

.hidden-xs (only) .hidden-sm (only) .hidden-md (only) .hidden-lg (only) .hidden-xl (only)